Streaky Bay student’s scientific trip to Venus

School science curriculum came to life for Streaky Bay Area School’s year seven students recently when they caught up with Natural Resources Eyre Peninsula staff for a fun and thought provoking day in Venus Bay Conservation Park.

The interactive, outdoor learning day, made possible through an Australian Government Targeted Area Grant, helped students learn about feral animals, the needs of endangered wildlife and importance of local National and Conservation Parks.

Natural Resources Officer Tayla Bowden said students learnt about ecosystems, how humans impact on wildlife, how species adapt and management of invasive species.

“Students put on their ‘Park Ranger thinking caps’ to explore different ways that they might control feral animals,” Ms Bowden said.

“They also thought up ways to help the park’s nationally threatened species recover, such as the national endangered Brush-tailed bettong and vulnerable to extinction Greater Bilby.

“We guided students through a how-to-do-habitat assessment, which is basically like a health check for the environment.It’s a method they will develop if they go on to be environmental scientists in future.

Streaky Bay Area School Teacher Karen O'Reilly was involved in the interactive day.

"The field trip to Venus Bay Conservation Park was a great opportunity to link and bring to life what we are learning about in the classroom to what science is happening in the field," Ms O’Reilly said.

Students were asked about their dream for nature, which resulted in some fantastic drawings and ideas being presented.

Student Meika Tomney (age 11 years) enjoyed the outdoor class.

“I learnt that bettongs can carry sticks and leaves around using their tails,” Meika said.

Students said highlights of the day included learning about different feral animal control methods, and finding scats and animal bones while walking through the park.

 


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